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Journal of Food Quality
Volume 2018, Article ID 7480910, 3 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/7480910
Editorial

Natural Strategies to Improve Quality in Food Protection

1Consiglio per la Ricerca in Agricoltura e l’Analisi dell’Economia Agraria (CREA), Centro di Ricerca Olivicoltura, Frutticoltura e Agrumicoltura (CREA-OFA), Acireale (CT), Italy
2Food and Nutrition Dept. (DEPAN), Universidade Estadual de Campinas, FEA-UNICAMP, Brazil
3Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping, Sweden

Correspondence should be addressed to Flora V. Romeo; ti.vog.aerc@oemor.airelavarolf

Received 3 September 2018; Accepted 29 November 2018; Published 26 December 2018

Copyright © 2018 Flora V. Romeo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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