Table of Contents
Journal of Histology
Volume 2014, Article ID 658293, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/658293
Research Article

Search for Conditions to Detect Epigenetic Marks and Nuclear Proteins in Immunostaining of the Testis and Cartilage

1Department of Pharmacology, Tsurumi University School of Dental Medicine, Yokohama 230-8501, Japan
2Laboratory of Physiological Sciences, Faculty of Human Sciences, Waseda University, Saitama 359-1192, Japan
3Transcriptome Profiling Group, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263-8555, Japan
4Department of Orthodontics, Tsurumi University School of Dental Medicine, Yokohama 230-8501, Japan
5Graduate School of Frontier Biosciences, Osaka University, Suita 565-0871, Japan

Received 8 January 2014; Accepted 10 February 2014; Published 19 March 2014

Academic Editor: Luigi F. Rodella

Copyright © 2014 Hisashi Ideno et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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