Journal of Healthcare Engineering

Journal of Healthcare Engineering / 2010 / Article

Research Article | Open Access

Volume 1 |Article ID 764691 | 0 page | https://doi.org/10.1260/2040-2295.1.4.579

The Use of Scan Statistics and Control Charts in Assessing Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia Quality Control Programs

Abstract

Scan statistics are concerned with clusters of events over time. In the realm of critical care medicine, such clusters might include the occurrence of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). Given N patients over time, the number of observations in a “moving window” of fixed length can be counted and the maximum cluster value becomes a scan statistic for which both parametric and exact methods exist to calculate its rarity. A statistically unusual cluster may indicate a breakdown in quality. Another approach to monitoring rare events is a g-type statistical process control chart where prospectively observing unusually long periods of time between events can indicate a significant improvement in quality. Both methods are presented in detail and applied to a 24-bed medical/surgical ICU's experience with VAP during a 27-month period.

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