Journal of Healthcare Engineering

Journal of Healthcare Engineering / 2012 / Article

Research Article | Open Access

Volume 3 |Article ID 489173 | 16 pages | https://doi.org/10.1260/2040-2295.3.4.535

Applications of Nanotechnology in Bladder Cancer Therapy

Received01 Jun 2012
Accepted01 Sep 2012

Abstract

Effective therapies can prevent superficial bladder cancer from developing into muscle-invasive stage or more severe stages which require radical cystectomy and negatively affect life quality. In terms of therapeutic approaches against superficial bladder cancer, intravesical (regional) therapy has several advantages over oral (systemic) therapy. Though urologists can directly deliver drugs to bladder lesions by intravesical instillation after transurethral resection, the efficacy of conventional drug delivery is usually low due to the bladder permeability barrier and bladder periodical discharge. Nanoparticles have been well developed as pharmaceutical carriers. By their versatile properties, nanoparticles can greatly improve the interactions between urothelium and drugs and also enhance the penetration of drugs into urothelium with lesions, which dramatically improves therapeutic efficacy. In this review, we discuss the advances of nanotechnology in bladder cancer therapy by different types of nanoparticles with different encapsulating materials.

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