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Journal of Healthcare Engineering
Volume 4, Issue 1, Pages 23-46
http://dx.doi.org/10.1260/2040-2295.4.1.23
Research Article

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Contrast Agents for Tumor Diagnosis

Weiren Cheng,1,2 Yuan Ping,1 Yong Zhang,2 Kai-Hsiang Chuang,3 and Ye Liu1

1Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, Agency for Science, Technology and Research, Singapore
2Singapore Bioimaging Consortium (SBIC), Agency for Science, Technology and Research, Singapore
3Division of Bioengineering, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore

Received 1 August 2012; Accepted 1 November 2012

Copyright © 2013 Hindawi Publishing Corporation. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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