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Journal of Healthcare Engineering
Volume 4, Issue 1, Pages 87-108
http://dx.doi.org/10.1260/2040-2295.4.1.87
Research Article

Responses of Cancer Cells Induced by Photodynamic Therapy

Toshihiro Kushibiki, Takeshi Hirasawa, Shinpei Okawa, and Miya Ishihara

Department of Medical Engineering, National Defense Medical College, Japan

Received 1 July 2012; Accepted 1 November 2012

Copyright © 2013 Hindawi Publishing Corporation. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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