Journal of Healthcare Engineering

Journal of Healthcare Engineering / 2014 / Article

Research Article | Open Access

Volume 5 |Article ID 431728 | https://doi.org/10.1260/2040-2295.5.1.79

Robert L. Duschka, Hanne Wojtczyk, Nikolaos Panagiotopoulos, Julian Haegele, Gael Bringout, Thorsten M. Buzug, Joerg Barkhausen, Florian M. Vogt, "Safety Measurements for Heating of Instruments for Cardiovascular Interventions in Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) - First Experiences", Journal of Healthcare Engineering, vol. 5, Article ID 431728, 16 pages, 2014. https://doi.org/10.1260/2040-2295.5.1.79

Safety Measurements for Heating of Instruments for Cardiovascular Interventions in Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) - First Experiences

Received01 May 2013
Accepted01 Oct 2013

Abstract

Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) has emerged as a new imaging method with the potential of delivering images of high spatial and temporal resolutions and free of ionizing radiation. Recent studies demonstrated the feasibility of differentiation between signal-generating and non-signal-generating devices in Magnetic Particle Spectroscopy (MPS) and visualization of commercially available catheters and guide-wires in MPI itself. Thus, MPI seems to be a promising imaging tool for cardiovascular interventions. Several commercially available catheters and guide-wires were tested in this study regarding heating. Heating behavior was correlated to the spectra generated by the devices and measured by the MPI. The results indicate that each instrument should be tested separately due to the wide spectrum of measured temperature changes of signal-generating instruments, which is up to 85°C in contrast to non-signal-generating devices. Development of higher temperatures seems to be a limitation for the use of these devices in cardiovascular interventions.

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Copyright © 2014 Hindawi Publishing Corporation. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


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