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Journal of Healthcare Engineering
Volume 2016, Article ID 5136705, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/5136705
Research Article

Stress Detection Using Low Cost Heart Rate Sensors

Medical Informatics R&D Centre, University of Pannonia, Egyetem Utca 10, Veszprém 8200, Hungary

Received 11 March 2016; Accepted 5 May 2016

Academic Editor: Valentina Camomilla

Copyright © 2016 Mario Salai et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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