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Journal of Healthcare Engineering
Volume 2017, Article ID 5740975, 10 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/5740975
Research Article

Gene Expression Changes in Long-Term In Vitro Human Blood-Brain Barrier Models and Their Dependence on a Transwell Scaffold Material

1American Society for Engineering Education Postdoctoral Fellowship Program, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC, USA
2Chemistry Division, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC, USA
3National Research Council Postdoctoral Fellowship Program, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC, USA
4Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, Arlington, VA, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Russell K. Pirlo; lim.yvan.lrn@olriP.llessuR

Received 20 June 2017; Revised 19 September 2017; Accepted 12 October 2017; Published 29 November 2017

Academic Editor: George Stan

Copyright © 2017 Joel D. Gaston et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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