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Journal of Healthcare Engineering
Volume 2017, Article ID 6183714, 10 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/6183714
Research Article

Noninvasive Evaluation of Portal Hypertension Using a Supervised Learning Technique

1Biomedical Engineering Institute, Kaunas University of Technology, Kaunas, Lithuania
2Gastroenterology Department, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania

Correspondence should be addressed to Mindaugas Marozas; ude.utk@sazoram.m

Received 21 May 2017; Revised 31 August 2017; Accepted 25 September 2017; Published 12 October 2017

Academic Editor: Andreas Maier

Copyright © 2017 Mindaugas Marozas et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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