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Clinical and Developmental Immunology
Volume 2007 (2007), Article ID 89017, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2007/89017
Review Article

IPEX as a Result of Mutations in FOXP3

1Department of Medical Oncology, Vrije Universiteit Medical Center, De Boelelaan 1117, Amsterdam 1081 HV, The Netherlands
2Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Erasmus Medical Center, Sophia Childrens' Hospital, Rotterdam 3000 GE, The Netherlands

Received 3 July 2007; Revised 12 August 2007; Accepted 13 August 2007

Academic Editor: Y. Liu

Copyright © 2007 Hans J. J. van der Vliet and Edward E. Nieuwenhuis. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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