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Clinical and Developmental Immunology
Volume 2008, Article ID 384982, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2008/384982
Research Article

Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells and Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells Differentially Facilitate Leukocyte Recruitment and Utilize Chemokines for T Cell Migration

Department of Neurosciences, Neuroinflammation Research Center, Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH 44195, USA

Received 20 July 2007; Revised 31 October 2007; Accepted 3 January 2008

Academic Editor: Charles Mackay

Copyright © 2008 Shumei Man et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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