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Clinical and Developmental Immunology
Volume 2010, Article ID 697158, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/697158
Review Article

Vaccines and Immunotherapeutics for the Treatment of Malignant Disease

1Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, 3601 4th Street, MS 6591, Lubbock, TX 79430, USA
2Department of Internal Medicine, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, 3601 4th Street, MS 9410, Lubbock, TX 79430, USA

Received 14 May 2010; Accepted 25 August 2010

Academic Editor: Dennis Klinman

Copyright © 2010 Joel F. Aldrich et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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