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Clinical and Developmental Immunology
Volume 2011, Article ID 819646, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/819646
Research Article

Different Pathological Roles of Toll-Like Receptor 9 on Mucosal B Cells and Dendritic Cells in Murine IgA Nephropathy

Division of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Juntendo University, Tokyo 113-8421, Japan

Received 22 December 2010; Accepted 2 May 2011

Academic Editor: K. Blaser

Copyright © 2011 Tadahiro Kajiyama et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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