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Clinical and Developmental Immunology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 193923, 18 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/193923
Review Article

Cellular and Humoral Mechanisms Involved in the Control of Tuberculosis

1Laboratory of Immunobiology and Genetics, Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Respiratorias Ismael Cosío Villegas, Tlalpan 4502, 14080 Mexico City, DF, Mexico
2Department of Immunology and Rheumatology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán, Vasco de Quiroga 15, Tlalpan, 14000 Mexico City, DF, Mexico
3Department of Transplants, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán, Vasco de Quiroga 15, 14000 Tlalpan, Mexico City, DF, Mexico
4Department of Pathology, The Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Department of Cancer Immunology and AIDS, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA

Received 10 December 2011; Revised 6 March 2012; Accepted 6 March 2012

Academic Editor: Hans Wilhelm Nijman

Copyright © 2012 Joaquin Zuñiga et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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