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Clinical and Developmental Immunology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 352493, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/352493
Research Article

Characterization of Outer Membrane Vesicles from Brucella melitensis and Protection Induced in Mice

1Departamento de Microbiología, Escuela Nacional de Ciencias Biológicas, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Prolongación de Carpio y Plan de Ayala S/N, Colonia Santo Tomás, 11340, Mexico, DF, Mexico
2Center for Molecular Medicine and Infectious Diseases, Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24060, USA
3Programa de Genómica Funcional de Procariotes, Centro de Ciencias Genómicas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Avenue Universidad s/n, P.O. Box 565-A, 62210 Cuernavaca, MOR, Mexico

Received 1 July 2011; Revised 29 August 2011; Accepted 12 September 2011

Academic Editor: Georgios Pappas

Copyright © 2012 Eric Daniel Avila-Calderón et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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