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Clinical and Developmental Immunology
Volume 2012, Article ID 502156, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/502156
Review Article

Hepatitis C Virus Infection and Mixed Cryoglobulinemia

1Department of Biomedical Sciences and Human Oncology, Section of Internal Medicine and Clinical Oncology, Liver Unit, University of Bari Medical School 70124, Bari, Italy
2Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Foggia, 71122 Foggia, Italy

Received 11 May 2012; Accepted 11 June 2012

Academic Editor: Domenico Sansonno

Copyright © 2012 Gianfranco Lauletta et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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