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Clinical and Developmental Immunology
Volume 2012, Article ID 584374, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/584374
Review Article

Role of MHC-Linked Susceptibility Genes in the Pathogenesis of Human and Murine Lupus

First Department of Medicine, University Medical Center of Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz, 55131 Mainz, Germany

Received 24 February 2012; Accepted 7 May 2012

Academic Editor: Harris Perlman

Copyright © 2012 Manfred Relle and Andreas Schwarting. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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