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Clinical and Developmental Immunology
Volume 2012, Article ID 589494, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/589494
Research Article

Host Susceptibility to Brucella abortus Infection Is More Pronounced in IFN-γ knockout than IL-12/β2-Microglobulin Double-Deficient Mice

1Department of Biochemistry and Immunology, Institute of Biological Sciences, Federal University of Minas Gerais, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil
2Department of General Biology, Institute of Biological Sciences, Federal University of Minas Gerais, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil
3Department of Parasitology, Microbiology and Immunology, Biological Sciences Institute, Federal University of Juiz de Fora, 36036-900 Juiz de Fora, MG, Brazil

Received 28 July 2011; Accepted 19 September 2011

Academic Editor: Georgios Pappas

Copyright © 2012 Ana Paula M. S. Brandão et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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