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Clinical and Developmental Immunology
Volume 2012, Article ID 654143, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/654143
Review Article

Immune Development and Intestinal Microbiota in Celiac Disease

1Immunonutrition Research Group, Department of Metabolism and Nutrition, Institute of Food Science, Technology and Nutrition, Spanish National Research Council (ICTAN-CSIC), Calle José Antonio Novais, 10, 28040 Madrid, Spain
2Microbial Ecology and Nutrition Research Group, Institute of Agrochemistry and Food Technology, Spanish National Research Council (IATA-CSIC), Avenida Agustín Escardino, 7. Paterna, 46980 Valencia, Spain

Received 6 June 2012; Revised 6 August 2012; Accepted 13 August 2012

Academic Editor: Francisco J. Pérez-Cano

Copyright © 2012 Tamara Pozo-Rubio et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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