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Clinical and Developmental Immunology
Volume 2012, Article ID 708036, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/708036
Review Article

Significance of CD44 and CD24 as Cancer Stem Cell Markers: An Enduring Ambiguity

1Biomedical Research Centre, School of Environment & Life Sciences, University of Salford, Salford M5 4WT, UK
2Department of Medical Oncology, School of Cancer and Enabling Sciences, The University of Manchester, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Manchester M20 4BX, UK

Received 8 February 2012; Accepted 1 April 2012

Academic Editor: Michael H. Kershaw

Copyright © 2012 Appalaraju Jaggupilli and Eyad Elkord. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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