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Clinical and Developmental Immunology
Volume 2012, Article ID 720803, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/720803
Review Article

Invariant NKT Cells as Novel Targets for Immunotherapy in Solid Tumors

Department of Pathology, NYU School of Medicine, 550 First Avenue, MSB-521, New York, NY 10016, USA

Received 11 July 2012; Revised 2 September 2012; Accepted 2 September 2012

Academic Editor: T. Nakayama

Copyright © 2012 Karsten A. Pilones et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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