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Clinical and Developmental Immunology
Volume 2012, Article ID 756353, 24 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/756353
Review Article

Role of Immune Escape Mechanisms in Hodgkin's Lymphoma Development and Progression: A Whole New World with Therapeutic Implications

1Clinical Oncology Department, Hospital Universitario Virgen Macarena, 41009 Sevilla, Spain
2Molecular Biology and Research Section, Hospital de Tortosa Verge de la Cinta and IISPV, URV, 43201 Reus, Spain
3Radiotherapy Department, Hospital Universitario Virgen Macarena, 41009 Sevilla, Spain
4Clinical Oncology Department, Hospital Universitario Puerta de Hierro Majadahonda, 28222 Madrid, Spain
5Pathology Department, Hospital de Tortosa Verge de la Cinta and IISPV, URV, 43201 Reus, Spain

Received 26 February 2012; Accepted 5 June 2012

Academic Editor: Keith Knutson

Copyright © 2012 Luis de la Cruz-Merino et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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