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Clinical and Developmental Immunology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 932072, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/932072
Review Article

Perinatal Programming of Asthma: The Role of Gut Microbiota

Department of Pediatrics, University of Alberta, Edmonton Clinic Health Academy, 11405 87th Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G IC9

Received 5 July 2011; Accepted 14 September 2011

Academic Editor: Kuender D. Yang

Copyright © 2012 Meghan B. Azad and Anita L. Kozyrskyj. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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