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Clinical and Developmental Immunology
Volume 2012, Article ID 937253, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/937253
Review Article

Modulation of Tumor Tolerance in Primary Central Nervous System Malignancies

1Department of Pediatrics, Georgia Health Sciences University, 1120 Fifteenth Street, BT-1852, Augusta, GA 30912, USA
2Immunotherapy Center, Georgia Health Sciences University, 1120 Fifteenth Street, CN-4141A, Augusta, GA 30912, USA
3GHSU Cancer Center, Georgia Health Sciences University, 1120 Fifteenth Street, CN-4141A, Augusta, GA 30912, USA

Received 16 July 2011; Revised 29 September 2011; Accepted 3 October 2011

Academic Editor: C. Morimoto

Copyright © 2012 Theodore S. Johnson et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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