Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Clinical and Developmental Immunology
Volume 2012, Article ID 948218, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/948218
Clinical Study

The Phenotype of Circulating Follicular-Helper T Cells in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis Defines CD200 as a Potential Therapeutic Target

1School of Medicine and Pharmacology, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, The University of Western Australia, 4th Floor G Block, Hospital Avenue, Nedlands, Perth, WA 6009, Australia
2Nuffield Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Oxford, Old Road Campus, Roosevelt Drive, Henry Wellcome Building for Molecular Physiology, Oxford OX3 7BN, UK
3Nuffield Department of Rheumatology, Orthopaedics and Musculoskeletal Science, Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre, Windmill Road, Oxford OX3 7HE, UK

Received 6 June 2012; Accepted 26 August 2012

Academic Editor: G. Opdenakker

Copyright © 2012 Aron Chakera et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. L. Klareskog, A. I. Catrina, and S. Paget, “Rheumatoid arthritis,” The Lancet, vol. 373, no. 9664, pp. 659–672, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  2. K. Conrad, D. Roggenbuck, D. Reinhold, and T. Dörner, “Profiling of rheumatoid arthritis associated autoantibodies,” Autoimmunity Reviews, vol. 9, no. 6, pp. 431–435, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  3. M. Simon, E. Girbal, M. Sebbag et al., “The cytokeratin filament-aggregating protein filaggrin is the target of the so-called “antikeratin antibodies” autoantibodies specific for rheumatoid arthritis,” Journal of Clinical Investigation, vol. 92, no. 3, pp. 1387–1393, 1993. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  4. I. C. M. MacLennan, “Germinal centers,” Annual Review of Immunology, vol. 12, pp. 117–139, 1994. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  5. C. M. Weyand and J. J. Goronzy, “Ectopic germinal center formation in rheumatoid synovitis,” Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, vol. 987, pp. 140–149, 2003. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  6. J. J. Goronzy, P. Bartz-Bazzanella, W. Hu, M. C. Jendro, D. R. Walser-Kuntz, and C. M. Weyand, “Dominant clonotypes in the repertoire of peripheral CD4+ T cells in rheumatoid arthritis,” Journal of Clinical Investigation, vol. 94, no. 5, pp. 2068–2076, 1994. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  7. H. Roux, M. Bonnefoy-Cudraz, and P. Gaborit, “HLA-DR typing in 58 cases of rheumatoid arthritis,” Clinical Rheumatology, vol. 1, no. 2, pp. 112–116, 1982. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  8. P. Schaerli, K. Willimann, A. B. Lang, M. Lipp, P. Loetscher, and B. Moser, “CXC chemokine receptor 5 expression defines follicular homing T cells with B cell helper function,” Journal of Experimental Medicine, vol. 192, no. 11, pp. 1553–1562, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  9. R. L. Reinhardt, H. E. Liang, and R. M. Locksley, “Cytokine-secreting follicular T cells shape the antibody repertoire,” Nature Immunology, vol. 10, no. 4, pp. 385–393, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  10. C. G. Vinuesa, S. G. Tangye, B. Moser, and C. R. Mackay, “Follicular B helper T cells in antibody responses and autoimmunity,” Nature Reviews Immunology, vol. 5, no. 11, pp. 853–865, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  11. D. Gómez-Martín, M. Díaz-Zamudio, J. Romo-Tena, M. J. Ibarra-Sánchez, and J. Alcocer-Varela, “Follicular helper T cells poise immune responses to the development of autoimmune pathology,” Autoimmunity Reviews, vol. 10, no. 6, pp. 325–330, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  12. R. I. Nurieva, P. Treuting, J. Duong, R. A. Flavell, and C. Dong, “Inducible costimulator is essential for collagen-induced arthritis,” Journal of Clinical Investigation, vol. 111, no. 5, pp. 701–706, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  13. C. G. Vinuesa, M. C. Cook, C. Angelucci et al., “A RING-type ubiquitin ligase family member required to repress follicular helper T cells and autoimmunity,” Nature, vol. 435, no. 7041, pp. 452–458, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  14. W. Dong, P. Zhu, Y. Wang, and Z. Wang, “Follicular helper T cells in systemic lupus erythematosus: a potential therapeutic target,” Autoimmunity Reviews, vol. 10, no. 6, pp. 299–304, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  15. J. Ma, C. Zhu, B. Ma et al., “Increased frequency of circulating follicular helper T cells in patients with rheumatoid arthritis,” Clinical & Developmental Immunology, vol. 2012, Article ID 827480, 7 pages, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  16. N. Simpson, P. A. Gatenby, A. Wilson et al., “Expansion of circulating T cells resembling follicular helper T cells is a fixed phenotype that identifies a subset of severe systemic lupus erythematosus,” Arthritis and Rheumatism, vol. 62, no. 1, pp. 234–244, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  17. R. Morita, N. Schmitt, S. E. Bentebibel et al., “Human blood CXCR5+CD4+ T cells are counterparts of T follicular cells and contain specific subsets that differentially support antibody secretion,” Immunity, vol. 34, no. 1, pp. 108–121, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  18. D. Breitfeld, L. Ohl, E. Kremmer et al., “Follicular B helper T cells express CXC chemokine receptor 5, localize to B cell follicles, and support immunoglobulin production,” Journal of Experimental Medicine, vol. 192, no. 11, pp. 1545–1551, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  19. F. C. Arnett, S. M. Edworthy, D. A. Bloch et al., “The American Rheumatism Association 1987 revised criteria for the classification of rheumatoid arthritis,” Arthritis and Rheumatism, vol. 31, no. 3, pp. 315–324, 1988. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  20. H. M'Hidi, M. L. Thibult, B. Chetaille et al., “High expression of the inhibitory receptor BTLA in T-follicular helper cells and in B-cell small lymphocytic lymphoma/chronic lymphocytic leukemia,” American Journal of Clinical Pathology, vol. 132, no. 4, pp. 589–596, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  21. L. De Rycke, I. Peene, I. E. A. Hoffman et al., “Rheumatoid factor and anticitrullinated protein antibodies in rheumatoid arthritis: diagnosis value, associations with radiological progression rate, and extra-articular manifestations,” Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, vol. 63, no. 12, pp. 1587–1593, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  22. Z. Chen, P. A. Marsden, and R. M. Gorczynski, “Role of a distal enhancer in the transcriptional responsiveness of the human CD200 gene to interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α,” Molecular Immunology, vol. 46, no. 10, pp. 1951–1963, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  23. E. Šimelyte, G. Criado, D. Essex, R. A. Uger, M. Feldmann, and R. O. Williams, “CD200-Fc, a novel antiarthritic biologic agent that targets proinflammatory cytokine expression in the joints of mice with collagen-induced arthritis,” Arthritis and Rheumatism, vol. 58, no. 4, pp. 1038–1043, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  24. M. A. Linterman, R. J. Rigby, R. K. Wong et al., “Follicular helper T cells are required for systemic autoimmunity,” Journal of Experimental Medicine, vol. 206, no. 3, pp. 561–576, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  25. Y. L. Hu, D. P. Metz, J. Chung, G. Siu, and M. Zhang, “B7RP-1 blockade ameliorates autoimmunity through regulation of follicular helper T cells,” Journal of Immunology, vol. 182, no. 3, pp. 1421–1428, 2009. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  26. F. Lachenal, F. Berger, H. Ghesquières et al., “Angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma: clinical and laboratory features at diagnosis in 77 patients,” Medicine, vol. 86, no. 5, pp. 282–292, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  27. S. Takemura, A. Braun, C. Crowson et al., “Lymphoid neogenesis in rheumatoid synovitis,” Journal of Immunology, vol. 167, no. 2, pp. 1072–1080, 2001. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  28. S. Raychaudhuri, B. P. Thomson, E. F. Remmers et al., “Genetic variants at CD28, PRDM1 and CD2/CD58 are associated with rheumatoid arthritis risk,” Nature Genetics, vol. 41, no. 12, pp. 1313–1318, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  29. C. J. Lessard, I. Adrianto, J. A. Kelly et al., “Identification of a systemic lupus erythematosus susceptibility locus at 11p13 between PDHX and CD44 in a multiethnic study,” American Journal of Human Genetics, vol. 88, no. 1, pp. 83–91, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  30. S. K. Yoshinaga, J. S. Whorlskey, S. D. Khare et al., “T-cell co-stimulation through B7RP-1 and ICOS,” Nature, vol. 402, no. 6763, pp. 827–830, 1999. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  31. C. Dong, A. E. Juedes, U. A. Temann et al., “ICOS co-stimulatory receptor is essential for T-cell activation and function,” Nature, vol. 409, no. 6816, pp. 97–101, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  32. Y. Katsumata, M. Harigai, T. Sugiura et al., “Attenuation of experimental autoimmune myositis by blocking ICOS-ICOS ligand interaction,” Journal of Immunology, vol. 179, no. 6, pp. 3772–3779, 2007. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  33. H. Iwai, Y. Kozono, S. Hirose et al., “Amelioration of collagen-induced arthritis by blockade of inducible costimulator-B7 homologous protein costimulation,” Journal of Immunology, vol. 169, no. 8, pp. 4332–4339, 2002. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  34. M. Kuwana, S. Nomura, K. Fujimura et al., “Effect of a single injection of humanized anti-CD154 monoclonal antibody on the platelet-specific autoimmune response in patients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura,” Blood, vol. 103, no. 4, pp. 1229–1236, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  35. A. N. Barclay, G. J. Wright, G. Brooke, and M. H. Brown, “CD200 and membrane protein interactions in the control of myeloid cells,” Trends in Immunology, vol. 23, no. 6, pp. 285–290, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  36. M. C. Jenmalm, H. Cherwinski, E. P. Bowman, J. H. Phillips, and J. D. Sedgwick, “Regulation of myeloid cell function through the CD200 receptor,” Journal of Immunology, vol. 176, no. 1, pp. 191–199, 2006. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  37. S. Zhang, H. Cherwinski, J. D. Sedgwick, and J. H. Phillips, “Molecular mechanisms of CD200 inhibition of mast cell activation,” Journal of Immunology, vol. 173, no. 11, pp. 6786–6793, 2004. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  38. N. Koning, L. Bö, R. M. Hoek, and I. Huitinga, “Downregulation of macrophage inhibitory molecules in multiple sclerosis lesions,” Annals of Neurology, vol. 62, no. 5, pp. 504–514, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  39. D. A. Copland, C. J. Calder, B. J. E. Raveney et al., “Monoclonal antibody-mediated CD200 receptor signaling suppresses macrophage activation and tissue damage in experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis,” American Journal of Pathology, vol. 171, no. 2, pp. 580–588, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  40. M. D. Rosenblum, E. B. Olasz, K. B. Yancey et al., “Expression of CD200 on epithelial cells of the murine hair follicle: a role in tissue-specific immune tolerance?” Journal of Investigative Dermatology, vol. 123, no. 5, pp. 880–887, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  41. L. A. Garza, C. C. Yang, T. Zhao et al., “Bald scalp in men with androgenetic alopecia retains hair follicle stem cells but lacks CD200-rich and CD34-positive hair follicle progenitor cells,” Journal of Clinical Investigation, vol. 121, no. 2, pp. 613–622, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  42. R. H. Hoek, S. R. Ruuls, C. A. Murphy et al., “Down-regulation of the macrophage lineage through interaction with OX2 (CD200),” Science, vol. 290, no. 5497, pp. 1768–1771, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  43. K. Söderströma, E. Stein, P. Colmenero et al., “Natural killer cells trigger osteoclastogenesis and bone destruction in arthritis,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 107, no. 29, pp. 13028–13033, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  44. E. S. K. Rijkers, T. de Ruiter, A. Baridi, H. Veninga, R. M. Hoek, and L. Meyaard, “The inhibitory CD200R is differentially expressed on human and mouse T and B lymphocytes,” Molecular Immunology, vol. 45, no. 4, pp. 1126–1135, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  45. R. J. Snelgrove, J. Goulding, A. M. Didierlaurent et al., “A critical function for CD200 in lung immune homeostasis and the severity of influenza infection,” Nature Immunology, vol. 9, no. 9, pp. 1074–1083, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  46. E. Šimelyte, S. Alzabin, I. Boudakov, and R. Williams, “CD200R1 regulates the severity of arthritis but has minimal impact on the adaptive immune response,” Clinical and Experimental Immunology, vol. 162, no. 1, pp. 163–168, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  47. V. Appay, S. Reynard, V. Voelter, P. Romero, D. E. Speiser, and S. Leyvraz, “Immuno-monitoring of CD8+ T cells in whole blood versus PBMC samples,” Journal of Immunological Methods, vol. 309, no. 1-2, pp. 192–199, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus