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Clinical and Developmental Immunology
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 325481, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/325481
Research Article

Propofol Reduces Lipopolysaccharide-Induced, NADPH Oxidase (NOX2) Mediated TNF-α and IL-6 Production in Macrophages

1Department of Anesthesiology, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Shandong University, No. 107 Wen Hua Xi Road, Jinan, Shandong 250012, China
2Department of Pathogeny Biology, Shandong University School of Medicine, No. 44 Wen Hua Xi Road, Jinan, Shandong 250012, China
3Department of Cardiology, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Shandong University, No. 107 Wen Hua Xi Road, Jinan, Shandong 250012, China

Received 26 August 2013; Revised 11 October 2013; Accepted 13 October 2013

Academic Editor: Eirini I. Rigopoulou

Copyright © 2013 Tao Meng et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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