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Clinical and Developmental Immunology
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 430239, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/430239
Review Article

MicroRNAs Implicated in the Immunopathogenesis of Lupus Nephritis

1Department of Biomedical Sciences & Pathobiology, Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061, USA
2Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine, Blacksburg, VA 24060, USA

Received 12 February 2013; Revised 20 May 2013; Accepted 12 June 2013

Academic Editor: Richard J. Quigg

Copyright © 2013 Cristen B. Chafin and Christopher M. Reilly. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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