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Clinical and Developmental Immunology
Volume 2013, Article ID 624123, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/624123
Review Article

Understanding Dendritic Cells and Their Role in Cutaneous Carcinoma and Cancer Immunotherapy

1Department of Dermatology, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, NY 10016, USA
2Lab for Investigative Dermatology, Rockefeller University, New York, NY 10065, USA
3Institute for Pediatric Urology, Weill Cornell Medical Center, New York, NY 10021, USA

Received 1 February 2013; Accepted 7 March 2013

Academic Editor: Mohamad Mohty

Copyright © 2013 Valerie R. Yanofsky et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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