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Clinical and Developmental Immunology
Volume 2013, Article ID 705232, 23 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/705232
Review Article

Neuroendocrine Immunoregulation in Multiple Sclerosis

Laboratory of Experimental Hematology, Vaccine and Infectious Disease Institute (Vaxinfectio), Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Antwerp, Antwerp University Hospital (UZA), 2650 Edegem, Belgium

Received 26 July 2013; Revised 29 September 2013; Accepted 30 September 2013

Academic Editor: Lenin Pavón

Copyright © 2013 Nathalie Deckx et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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