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Clinical and Developmental Immunology
Volume 2013, Article ID 791262, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/791262
Research Article

LMW Heparin Prevents Increased Kidney Expression of Proinflammatory Mediators in (NZBxNZW)F1 Mice

RNA and Molecular Pathology Research Group, Institute of Medical Biology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø, 9037 Tromsø, Norway

Received 11 February 2013; Revised 5 July 2013; Accepted 15 August 2013

Academic Editor: Kazuya Iwabuchi

Copyright © 2013 Annica Hedberg et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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