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Clinical and Developmental Immunology
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 831410, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/831410
Review Article

Chimerism-Based Experimental Models for Tolerance Induction in Vascularized Composite Allografts: Cleveland Clinic Research Experience

1Department of Plastic Surgery, Cleveland Clinic, 9500 Euclid Avenue, A-60, Cleveland, OH 44195, USA
2Institute of Immunology and Experimental Therapy, Polish Academy of Sciences, Rudolfa Weigla Street 12, 53-114 Wroclaw, Poland

Received 10 July 2012; Revised 12 February 2013; Accepted 12 February 2013

Academic Editor: A. W. Thomson

Copyright © 2013 Maria Siemionow and Aleksandra Klimczak. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

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