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Clinical and Developmental Immunology
Volume 2013, Article ID 852395, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/852395
Review Article

Regulatory T Cells in the Immunodiagnosis and Outcome of Kidney Allograft Rejection

1Division of Pharmacology, Department of Medicine of the Systems, University of Rome “Tor Vergata” Rome, Italy
2Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine of the Systems, University of Rome “Tor Vergata” Rome, Italy
3Division of Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine of the Systems, University of Rome “Tor Vergata” Rome, Italy

Received 1 February 2013; Revised 2 May 2013; Accepted 2 June 2013

Academic Editor: Anne M. Stevens

Copyright © 2013 O. Franzese et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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