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Clinical and Developmental Immunology
Volume 2013, Article ID 917198, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/917198
Review Article

Age-Dependent Differences in Systemic and Cell-Autonomous Immunity to L. monocytogenes

Division of Infectious & Immunological Diseases, Department of Pediatrics, University of British Columbia, CFRI Rm. A5-147, 938 West 28th Avenue, Vancouver, BC, Canada V5Z 4H4

Received 5 January 2013; Accepted 7 March 2013

Academic Editor: Philipp Henneke

Copyright © 2013 Ashley M. Sherrid and Tobias R. Kollmann. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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