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Clinical and Developmental Immunology
Volume 2013, Article ID 937846, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/937846
Clinical Study

The Association of CD81 Polymorphisms with Alloimmunization in Sickle Cell Disease

1Sheikh Zayed Institute for Pediatric Surgical Innovation, Children’s National Medical Center, 111 Michigan Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20010-2970, USA
2Department of Pediatrics, George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Washington, DC 20052, USA
3Immunology and Histocompatibility Department and INSERM, UMRS 940, Saint Louis Hospital, 75010 Paris, France
4Divisions of Hematology and Laboratory Medicine, Children’s National Medical Center, Washington, DC 20010, USA
5Etablissement Français du Sang (EFS), Tenon Hospital, 75020 Paris, France
6Centre de la Drépanocytose, Department of Internal Medicine, Tenon Hospital, 75020 Paris, France
7INSERM, U763, Robert Debré Hospital, 75019 Paris, France
8Hematology Department, Tenon Hospital, 75020 Paris, France

Received 27 February 2013; Revised 17 April 2013; Accepted 18 April 2013

Academic Editor: Daniel Rukavina

Copyright © 2013 Zohreh Tatari-Calderone et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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