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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2014, Article ID 239398, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/239398
Review Article

Revisiting the Molecular Mechanism of Neurological Manifestations in Antiphospholipid Syndrome: Beyond Vascular Damage

1Section of Neurology, Department of Translational Medicine, University of Eastern Piedmont, “Amedeo Avogadro”, Via Solaroli 17, 28100 Novara, Italy
2Interdisciplinary Research Center of Autoimmune Diseases (IRCAD), University of Eastern Piedmont, “Amedeo Avogadro”, Via Solaroli 17, 28100 Novara, Italy

Received 1 December 2013; Revised 4 February 2014; Accepted 12 February 2014; Published 13 March 2014

Academic Editor: Jozélio Freire De Carvalho

Copyright © 2014 M. Carecchio et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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