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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 394127, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/394127
Research Article

Construction of a Chimeric Secretory IgA and Its Neutralization Activity against Avian Influenza Virus H5N1

1State Key Laboratory of Pathogen and Biosecurity, Beijing Institute of Microbiology and Epidemiology, Beijing 100071, China
2Centre of Excellence in Molecular Biology (CEMB), University of the Punjab, Lahore-53700, Pakistan

Received 7 September 2013; Accepted 7 January 2014; Published 13 February 2014

Academic Editor: Jiri Mestecky

Copyright © 2014 Cun Li et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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