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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 395626, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/395626
Research Article

A Mycobacterium bovis BCG-Naked DNA Prime-Boost Vaccination Strategy Induced CD4+ and CD8+ T-Cell Response against Mycobacterium tuberculosis Immunogens

Laboratory of Infection and Immunity, School of Basic Medical Science, West China Center of Medical Sciences, Sichuan University, No. 17, Third Section, Ren Min Nan Road, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041, China

Received 11 November 2013; Revised 2 January 2014; Accepted 6 February 2014; Published 11 March 2014

Academic Editor: Beatrice Saviola

Copyright © 2014 Miao Lu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection is still a major global public health problem. Presently the only tuberculosis (TB) vaccine available is Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG), although it fails to adequately protect against pulmonary TB in adults. To solve this problem, the development of a new effective vaccine is urgently desired. BCG-prime DNA-booster vaccinations strategy has been shown to induce greater protection against tuberculosis (TB) than BCG alone. Some studies have demonstrated that the two genes (Rv1769 and Rv1772) are excellent T-cell antigens and could induce T-cell immune responses. In this research, we built BCG-C or BCG-P prime-recombination plasmid PcDNA3.1-Rv1769 or PcDNA3.1-Rv1772 boost vaccinations strategy to immunize BALB/c mice and evaluated its immunogenicity. The data suggests that the BCG-C+3.1-72 strategy could elicit the most long-lasting and strongest Th1-type cellular immune responses and the BCG-C+3.1-69 strategy could induce the high level CD8+ T-cell response at certain time points. These findings support the ideas that the prime-boost strategy as a combination of vaccines may be better than a single vaccine for protection against tuberculosis.