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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2014, Article ID 462740, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/462740
Review Article

Role of Microbiota and Innate Immunity in Recurrent Clostridium difficile Infection

A. Gemelli Hospital, Division of Internal Medicine and Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine and Surgery, Catholic University, 8, 00168 Rome, Italy

Received 12 February 2014; Accepted 20 May 2014; Published 5 June 2014

Academic Editor: Rossella Cianci

Copyright © 2014 Stefano Bibbò et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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