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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2014, Article ID 857143, 17 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/857143
Review Article

The Role of Dendritic Cells in Tissue-Specific Autoimmunity

1Center for Health Disparities and Molecular Medicine, 11085 Campus Street, Mortensen Hall, Department of Basic Sciences, Loma Linda University School of Medicine, Loma Linda, CA 92354, USA
2Endocrinology Section, JL Pettis Memorial VA Medical Center, Loma Linda, CA 92354, USA

Received 27 December 2013; Revised 20 March 2014; Accepted 8 April 2014; Published 30 April 2014

Academic Editor: Loredana Frasca

Copyright © 2014 Jacques Mbongue et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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