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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2015, Article ID 145859, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/145859
Review Article

The Role of Intestinal Microbiota in Acute Graft-versus-Host Disease

1Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Tumor Immunology, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Infection and Immunity, Institutes of Biology and Medical Sciences, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123, China
2Cyrus Tang Hematology Center, Department of Hematology, Jiangsu Institute of Hematology, Collaborative Innovation Center of Hematology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215006, China

Received 25 December 2014; Revised 16 February 2015; Accepted 28 February 2015

Academic Editor: Pedro Giavina-Bianchi

Copyright © 2015 Yuanyuan Chen et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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