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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2015, Article ID 162639, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/162639
Research Article

Human Gene Expression in Uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum Malaria

1Center for Infectious Diseases, Tulane University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA
2Department of Tropical Medicine, Tulane University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA
3Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA
4Center for Gene Therapy, Tulane University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA
5Department of Biology, University of Mary Hardin-Baylor, 900 College Street, Box 8432, Belton, TX 76513, USA
6The Faculties of Science, Technology, Medicine, Pharmacy, and Odontostomatology, University of Bamako, Bamako, Mali
7Institute of Microbiology, University of Lausanne, 1011 Lausanne, Switzerland
8Department of Medicine, Tulane University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA

Received 13 November 2014; Revised 30 December 2014; Accepted 2 January 2015

Academic Editor: Muhammad Abubakar

Copyright © 2015 James M. Colborn et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

To examine human gene expression during uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria, we obtained three samples (acute illness, treatment, and recovery) from 10 subjects and utilized each subject’s recovery sample as their baseline. At the time of acute illness (day 1), subjects had upregulation of innate immune response, cytokine, and inflammation-related genes (IL-1, IL-6, TNF, and IFN-), which was more frequent with parasitemias 100,000 per L and body temperatures 39C. Apoptosis-related genes (Fas, BAX, and TP53) were upregulated acutely and for several days thereafter (days 1–3). In contrast, the expression of immune-modulatory (transcription factor 7, HLV-DOA, and CD6) and apoptosis inhibitory (c-myc, caspase 8, and Fas Ligand G) genes was downregulated initially and returned to normal with clinical recovery (days 7–10). These results indicate that the innate immune response, cytokine, and apoptosis pathways are upregulated acutely in uncomplicated malaria with concomitant downregulation of immune-modulatory and apoptosis inhibitory genes.