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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2015, Article ID 235170, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/235170
Review Article

Regulators and Effectors of Arf GTPases in Neutrophils

1Division of Infectious Diseases and Immunology, CHU de Quebec Research Center, Quebec, QC, Canada G1V 4G2
2Faculty of Medicine, Laval University, Quebec, QC, Canada G1V 0A6

Received 11 August 2015; Accepted 30 September 2015

Academic Editor: Clifford Lowell

Copyright © 2015 Jouda Gamara et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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