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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 328146, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/328146
Research Article

IL-34 Suppresses Candida albicans Induced TNFα Production in M1 Macrophages by Downregulating Expression of Dectin-1 and TLR2

1Tissue Engineering and Reparative Dentistry, School of Dentistry, Cardiff University, Heath Park, Cardiff CF14 4XY, UK
2Tianjin Key Laboratory of Biomaterial Research, Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Medical Science, Tianjin 300192, China

Received 20 February 2015; Accepted 30 April 2015

Academic Editor: Pedro Giavina-Bianchi

Copyright © 2015 Rong Xu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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