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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 471342, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/471342
Review Article

Lessons from Microglia Aging for the Link between Inflammatory Bone Disorders and Alzheimer’s Disease

Department of Aging Science and Pharmacology, Faculty of Dental Science, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8582, Japan

Received 11 September 2014; Revised 16 January 2015; Accepted 16 January 2015

Academic Editor: Jacek Tabarkiewicz

Copyright © 2015 Zhou Wu and Hiroshi Nakanishi. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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