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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 482089, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/482089
Research Article

In Vitro and In Vivo Comparison of Lymphocytes Transduced with a Human CD16 or with a Chimeric Antigen Receptor Reveals Potential Off-Target Interactions due to the IgG2 CH2-CH3 CAR-Spacer

1UMR INSERM U892, 8 Quai Moncousu, 44007 Nantes Cedex, France
2Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Nantes, 1 Place Ricordeau, 44000 Nantes, France
3UMR INSERM 1052, Centre Léon Bérard, 28 rue Laennec, 69008 Lyon, France
4Genenthec Inc., South San Francisco, CA 94080, USA

Received 18 September 2015; Accepted 22 October 2015

Academic Editor: Roberta Castriconi

Copyright © 2015 Béatrice Clémenceau et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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