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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 523875, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/523875
Review Article

Secretory Products of Trichinella spiralis Muscle Larvae and Immunomodulation: Implication for Autoimmune Diseases, Allergies, and Malignancies

1Institute for the Application of Nuclear Energy (INEP), University of Belgrade, Banatska 31b, 11080 Belgrade, Serbia
2Centre for Infectious Disease Control Netherlands, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), P.O. Box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven, Netherlands

Received 19 March 2015; Accepted 18 May 2015

Academic Editor: Senthamil R. Selvan

Copyright © 2015 Ljiljana Sofronic-Milosavljevic et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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