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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 614127, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/614127
Review Article

HIV and the Gut Microbiota, Partners in Crime: Breaking the Vicious Cycle to Unearth New Therapeutic Targets

1Chronic Viral Illness Service, McGill University Health Centre, 3650 Saint Urbain, Montreal, QC, Canada H2X 2P4
2Research Institute, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC, Canada H3H 2R9
3Division of Hematology, McGill University Health Centre, 687 Pine Avenue West, Montreal, QC, Canada H3A 1A1

Received 18 July 2014; Accepted 22 October 2014

Academic Editor: David B. Ordiz

Copyright © 2015 Kishanda Vyboh et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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