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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2015, Article ID 630287, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/630287
Research Article

Regulation of Murine Ovarian Epithelial Carcinoma by Vaccination against the Cytoplasmic Domain of Anti-Müllerian Hormone Receptor II

1Department of Immunology, Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA
2School of Medicine, Department of Medical Biology, Genome and Stem Cell Research Center, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri, Turkey
3Department of Biology, Cleveland State University, Cleveland, OH, USA
4North American University, Texas Institute of Biotechnology, Education, and Research, 10555 Stella Link Road, No. 102, Houston, TX 77025, USA
5Western Reserve Academy, Hudson, OH, USA
6Department of Molecular Cardiology, Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA
7Developmental Therapeutics Program, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA, USA
8Department of Molecular Medicine, Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USA

Received 16 July 2015; Accepted 12 October 2015

Academic Editor: Fabio Pastorino

Copyright © 2015 Cagri Sakalar et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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