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Journal of Immunology Research
Volume 2015, Article ID 743169, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/743169
Review Article

Regulation of Dendritic Cell Function in Inflammation

Institut für Pharmazie (Pharmakologie und Toxikologie), Freie Universität Berlin, 14195 Berlin, Germany

Received 19 March 2015; Accepted 16 June 2015

Academic Editor: David Kaplan

Copyright © 2015 André Said and Günther Weindl. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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